LONGLEAF MUSIC (BMI)

Gamaka (fixed media)  

duration: 9:00

stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3055

price: $7

Galileo's Cry (fixed media)  

duration: 6:20

stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3015

price: $7

I Started (fixed media)  

duration: 1:45

stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3045

price: $5

Jungle Urbanus (fixed media)  

duration: 1:00

stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

Longleaf Catalog Number: 2775

price: $5

The Blue Marble (fixed media)  

duration: 9:30

stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3087

price: $7

Robot (violin, percussion, fixed media)  

duration: 8:30

score, parts, fixed media: stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

written for:  John Irrera, Annie Stevens

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3455

price: $15

Rocket (piano, fixed media)  

duration: 8:30

score, parts, fixed media: stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

written for:  Mary Hellmann

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3457

price: $15

Siren Song (soprano, fixed media)  

duration: 7:30

score, parts, fixed media: stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

written for:  Rachel Holland

Longleaf Catalog Number: 2985

price: $15

Prowler (trumpet, fixed media)  

duration: 7:30

score, parts, fixed media: stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

written for:  Kelly Rossum

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3459

price: $15

Sun, Moon, and Talia (trombone, piano, fixed media)  

duration: 9:00

score, parts, fixed media: stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

written for:  William Bootz, Mary Hellmann

Longleaf Catalog Number: 2123

price: $15

The Castle of Otranto (trombone, fixed media)  

duration: 10:00

score, parts, fixed media: stereo --CD, AIFF, MP3

written for:  William Bootz

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3299

price: $15

Abandoned Roadside Chorale (marimba duet)

duration: 5:00

score, parts

written for:  Escape Ten

                   Percussion Duo

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Keyboard Percussion Publications (click to order)

Clowns (trombone)  

duration: 5:00

score

Longleaf Catalog Number: 2044

price: $15

Echoes Collide (flute, clarinet, violin, viola, cello, piano, percussion)  

duration: 11:00

score, parts

Longleaf Catalog Number: 1733

price: $35

Gilded Age (clarinet, trumpet, piano, percussion)  

duration: 8:00

score, parts

written for:  Pastiche Chamber Ensemble

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3555

price: $35

Hubble's Eye (transverso flute, Baroque violin, viola de gamba, harpsichord)  

duration: 10:00

score, parts

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3000

price: $35

In a Dream (clarinet, piano)  

duration: 6:15

score, part

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3055

price: $15

Nostalgie (harpsichord duet)  

duration: 8:30

2 scores

Longleaf Catalog Number: 2795

price: $15

Prelude (young wind ensemble)  

duration: 3:00

score, parts

Longleaf Catalog Number: 2900

price: score -$20, parts -$80

Ride The Wind (wind ensemble)  

duration: 7:30

score, parts

Longleaf Catalog Number: 2557

price: score -$40, parts -$160

Slant of Light (violin, cello, piano)  

duration: 8:30

score, parts

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3290

price: $15

Solstice (young orchesra, piano)  

duration: 5:20

score, parts

Longleaf Catalog Number: 4087

price: score -$40, parts -$160

Turning Again (flute, piano)  

duration: 9:30

score

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3025

price: $15

The Music of Christopher Cook

Performer(s) with Electronics (Tape)

Acoustic Chamber

Large Ensemble

Electronic Only (Tape)

(recordings for concert performance)

Program Note: (click More…)

Prowler contains several musical ideas that pursue one another while building suspense. These sometimes animalistic sounds and percussive grooves build and release tension throughout the piece. Some sections require the performer to improvise material and use extended playing techniques. The electronic accompaniment is largely composed of trumpet samples provided by Kelly Rossum, for whom the work was composed. The recorded samples were process and manipulated to provide the accompanying sonic world.

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recording (YouTube)

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Score Excerpt (opens in new window)

recording (YouTube)

recording (YouTube)

recording (YouTube)

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Score Excerpt (opens in new window)

recording (YouTube)

Program Note: (click More…)

Siren Song is a work for soprano and electronics. The electronic sounds are largely created from recordings of soprano Rachel Holland, for whom the work was composed. It recreates the Song of the Sirens from Greek mythology, luring sailors with their seductive voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island. Odysseus, in his wanderings through the Mediterranean, came near the island. On the advice of Circe, he stuffed the ears of his companions with wax, and tied himself to the mast of his vessel, until he was far away and no longer could hear their song. The vocal recordings are manipulated through a variety of processes to construct the “sound world” for the composition. Certain partials were extracted to create new sung vowels, rich textures (or fields) of voices, and water-like sounds to accompany the live siren. This interchange creates a balancing effect between light and dark (major and minor musical intervals). The positioning of the vocalist on stage and her movement during the performance enhances this effect. The piece ends with electronic raindrops that began life as vocal notes.

Program Note: (click More…)

NASA's Wallops Flight Facility is located on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. It is used primarily as a rocket launch site to support science and exploration missions for NASA and other U.S. government agencies. The WFF includes an extensively instrumented range to support launches of more than a dozen types of sounding rockets, small expendable suborbital and orbital rockets. At our home in coastal Northeastern North Carolina, we have an extraordinary view of launches from Wallops Island. Rocket, composed for pianist Mary Hellmann, was inspired by these spectacular nighttime events. The work is divided into four main sections; Construction, Blastoff, Space Waltz, Fireflies, and Re-entry, followed by a brief Coda. The electronic part was generated largely from piano samples. Synthesized sounds are also employed adding a classic Sci-Fi environment to the work.

Program Note: (click More…)

Robot is inspired by a common science fiction theme: the development of a conscious and highly intelligent robot, motivated to take over or destroy the human race. The work follows the awakening of a giant machine. Its mechanical heart engages as the music reaches an extended mechanical groove. After a failure, a reboot heralds a second more intense groove. Several classic electronic sounds associated with science fiction movies of the 1950’s and 60’s are employed throughout. The piece was written for John Irrera and Annie Stevens.

Program Note: (click More…)

Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto, published as a Christmas book in 1764, is the first and one of the greatest members of the Gothic novel genre. This work is credited with motivating the Gothic revival in the arts and served as the model in plot, characterizations, setting and tone for hundreds, perhaps thousands of successors. Editor E. F. Bleiler states, “The Castle of Otranto is not, of course, a great novel, and it would be absurd to claim greatness for it. But Walpole was an intelligent man and a lively personality, and his individual charm can be perceived in his novel. The question whether his horrors are truly frightening or simply ludicrous is a matter for the individual reader to decide.” The novel is full of sentimentalism and cheap emotion, hair-raising incident (often with supernatural overtones, e.g. a sighing portrait and floating giant helmet that crushes its victim), and a relentless pace. William Bootz commissioned, with novel in hand, a work for trombone and electronics inspired by this wealth of imagery. Among the arsenal of sounds on the tape are processed trombone, vocal, and bell (inspired by the novel’s church bells) sounds. A sense of castle’s vast interior is achieved through echoing techniques.

Program Note: (click More…)

Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto, published as a Christmas book in 1764, is the first and one of the greatest members of the Gothic novel genre. This work is credited with motivating the Gothic revival in the arts and served as the model in plot, characterizations, setting and tone for hundreds, perhaps thousands of successors. Editor E. F. Bleiler states, “The Castle of Otranto is not, of course, a great novel, and it would be absurd to claim greatness for it. But Walpole was an intelligent man and a lively personality, and his individual charm can be perceived in his novel. The question whether his horrors are truly frightening or simply ludicrous is a matter for the individual reader to decide.” The novel is full of sentimentalism and cheap emotion, hair-raising incident (often with supernatural overtones, e.g. a sighing portrait and floating giant helmet that crushes its victim), and a relentless pace. William Bootz commissioned, with novel in hand, a work for trombone and electronics inspired by this wealth of imagery. Among the arsenal of sounds on the tape are processed trombone, vocal, and bell (inspired by the novel’s church bells) sounds. A sense of castle’s vast interior is achieved through echoing techniques.

Program Note: (click More…)

Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto, published as a Christmas book in 1764, is the first and one of the greatest members of the Gothic novel genre. This work is credited with motivating the Gothic revival in the arts and served as the model in plot, characterizations, setting and tone for hundreds, perhaps thousands of successors. Editor E. F. Bleiler states, “The Castle of Otranto is not, of course, a great novel, and it would be absurd to claim greatness for it. But Walpole was an intelligent man and a lively personality, and his individual charm can be perceived in his novel. The question whether his horrors are truly frightening or simply ludicrous is a matter for the individual reader to decide.” The novel is full of sentimentalism and cheap emotion, hair-raising incident (often with supernatural overtones, e.g. a sighing portrait and floating giant helmet that crushes its victim), and a relentless pace. William Bootz commissioned, with novel in hand, a work for trombone and electronics inspired by this wealth of imagery. Among the arsenal of sounds on the tape are processed trombone, vocal, and bell (inspired by the novel’s church bells) sounds. A sense of castle’s vast interior is achieved through echoing techniques.

Program Note: (click More…)

Sun, Moon, and Talia, is based on Giambattista Basile's version of the Sleeping Beauty tale published in his popular the 17th century collection The Pentamerone. Italian fairy tales were among the earliest versions of such stories to be published in Europe. These old renditions were bawdy and sexually charged (and clearly not meant for children). In Basile's version (learned from women storytellers in the countryside near Naples), Beauty, known as Talia, falls into a death–like sleep when a splinter of flax is from a spinning wheel is embedded under her fingernail. Her father, the Lord, is deeply distraught and leaves her to sleep alone in a house hidden deep within the forest. One day a King goes out hawking and discovers the sleeping maiden. Finding her beautiful, and unprotesting, he has sex with her — while Talia, oblivious to the King's ardent embraces, sleeps on. The King leaves the forest, returning not only to his castle but also to his barren wife. Nine months later a sleeping Talia gives birth to twins named Sun and Moon. One of the hungry infants, searching for his mother's breast, suckles her finger and pulls out the flax splinter. Freed of her curse by the removal of the splinter, Talia wakes up and discovers her children. After a time, the King goes back to the forest and finds Talia awake, tending to their son and daughter. Delighted, he brings them home to his estate — where his barren wife, naturally enough, is bitter and jealous. As soon as the King is off to battle, the wife orders her cook to murder Sun and Moon, and then prepare them as a feast for her unwitting husband. The kindhearted cook hides the children and substitutes goat in a dizzying variety of dishes. The wife then decides to murder Talia by burning her at the stake. As Talia undresses, each layer of her fine clothing shrieks out loud (in other versions, the bells sewn on her seven petticoats jingle). Eventually the King hears the sound and comes to Talia's rescue. The jealous wife is put to death, the cook reveals the children's hiding place, and the King and Talia are united in a proper marriage. Computer-generated sounds are featured in movements I and III. These sounds are created by reinventing the musical ideas played by the live performers. Often, the computer music follows and reacts to the live musicians. This work was written for William Bootz and Mary Hellmann. I. Talia, and the Spinning Wheel (•Talia, Sleeping Beauty, gets pricked by a splinter of flax from a spinning wheel. •later, as she slumbers, the King, out on a hunt, discovers her, and falls in love) II. The King, and the Queen (•the Queen hears of Talia and plots her jealous revenge) III. Talia, and the Fire (•the Queen plans to toss Talia in the fire as the bells toll •Talia remembers the King •the King searches for her) IV. Love, and the Resolution (•Talia, saved from the fire, and the King live happily ever after •The last line of the fairy tale--its moral--is as follows: "Lucky people, so 'tis said, He who has luck may go to bed, And bliss will rain upon his head.") Sun, Moon, and Talia was made possible by a grant from the Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard University.

Dreamscape (piano)  

duration: 6:15

score, part

Longleaf Catalog Number: 3065

price: $15

recording (YouTube)

Tango (viola, paino)  

duration: 3:30

2 scores

Longleaf Catalog Number: 2745

price: $8